Asthma and Allergy

Allergic asthma is asthma caused by an allergic reaction. It’s also known as allergy-induced asthma. People with allergic asthma usually start feeling symptoms after inhaling an allergen such as pollen. The Asthma and Allergy Foundation of America reports that more than half of people with asthma have allergic asthma. Allergic asthma is treatable in most cases. An allergen is a typically harmless substance such as dust mites, pet dander, pollen or mold. If you are allergic to a substance, this allergen triggers a response starting in the immune system. Through a complex reaction, these allergens then cause the passages in the airways of the lungs to become inflamed and swollen. This results in coughing, wheezing and other asthma symptoms

The same allergens that give some people sneezing fits and watery eyes can cause an asthma attack in others. Allergic asthma is the most common type of asthma. About 90% of kids with childhood asthma have allergies, compared with about 50% of adults with asthma. The symptoms that go along with allergic asthma show up after you breathe things called allergens  like pollen, dust mites, or mold. If you have asthma it usually gets worse after you exercise in cold air or after breathing smoke, dust, or fumes. Sometimes even a strong smell can set it off.

 

  • What is allergic asthma?
  • What are the causes of allergic asthma?
  • What are the symptoms of allergic asthma?
  • How is allergic asthma diagnosed?
  • What are the treatments for allergic asthma?
  • What are the potential complications of allergic asthma?
  • What are the potential complications of allergic asthma?

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